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THE FOUR TEMPERAMENTS

by REV. CONRAD HOCK


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CHAPTER V

THE PHLEGMATIC TEMPERAMENT

I NATURE OF THE PHLEGMATIC TEMPERAMENT

The soul or mind of the phlegmatic person is only weakly or not at all touched by impressions. The reaction is feeble or entirely missing. Eventual impressions fade away very soon.

II FUNDAMENTAL DISPOSITION OF THE PHLEGMATIC PERSON

1. He has very little interest in whatever goes on about him.

2. He has little inclination to work, but prefers repose and leisure. With him everything proceeds and develops slowly.

III BRIGHT SIDE OF THE PHLEGMATIC TEMPERAMENT

1. The phlegmatic works slowly, but perseveringly, if his work does not require much thinking.

2. He is not easily exasperated either by offenses, or by failures or sufferings. He remains composed, thoughtful, deliberate, and has a cold, sober, and practical judgment.

3. He has no intense passions and does not demand much of life.

IV DARK SIDE OF THE PHLEGMATIC TEMPERAMENT

1. He is very much inclined to ease, to eating and drinking; is lazy and neglects his duties.

2. He has no ambition, and does not aspire to lofty things, not even in his piety.

V THE TRAINING OF PHLEGMATIC CHILDREN

The training of phlegmatic children is very difficult, because external influence has little effect upon them and internal personal motives are lacking. It is necessary to explain everything most minutely to them, and repeat it again and again, so that at least some impression may be made to last, and to accustom them by patience and charity to follow strictly a well-planned rule of life. The application of corporal punishment is less dangerous in the education of phlegmatic children; it is much more beneficial to them than to other children, especially to those of choleric or melancholic temperament.